National Review Online

Bloomberg Bans Again

Having already banned smoking and large soft drinks, and taken steps against trans fats and salt, America’s foremost proponent of government control over consumer choices has set his sights on Styrofoam food containers. But don’t worry. “We’re not banning everything!” Mayor Michael Bloomberg insists. So take solace, New Yorkers — this is a significant pullback from the mayor’s 2007 statement: “We ban everything.”

Banning Styrofoam (actually a brand name; the general term is polystyrene foam) is yet another ridiculous “priority” from the mayor who overturned the city’s term limits — twice approved by the voters — on the theory that his financial expertise was indispensable, then spent his third term ignoring finances so he could focus on banning, well, maybe not everything, but a lot of things.

Read the rest at National Review Online.


Obama Out-Taxes Clinton

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President Obama likes his Clinton nostalgia — he has told the American people his tax increases are a return to the policies of the booming Nineties. It is ironic, therefore, that Obama insists on actually reversing one of the most critical economic successes from the Clinton years: the capital-gains tax cut. Before Clinton signed the 1997 budget deal, the capital-gains rate was 28 percent, and with Clinton’s approval of the cut it fell to 20 percent; Obama now insists on raising it to 23.8 percent, undoing not just Bush’s capital-gains-tax cut but almost half of Clinton’s, too. Such a move would undermine the fragile economic recovery while being unlikely to raise any federal revenue.

Read the rest at National Review Online.


Opting Out of Hidden Taxes

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The Senate shouldn’t let the IRS trample states on health care.

By Phil Kerpen

In an affront to openness and representative government, the IRS is attempting to rewrite the president’s health-care law to overrule states that lawfully opted out of vast new taxpayer-funded subsidies to insurance companies. Fortunately, Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin has stepped forward with a resolution, S.J. Res. 48, that would overturn the IRS power grab. If enough of his Senate colleagues sign on, he can force a Senate floor vote, giving the American people an opportunity to see where every senator stands. It might be the only health-care vote in the Senate before the November elections.

Read the rest at National Review Online and fight back at IRSPowerGrab.com.


The Crony War on Coal

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Natural-gas companies and environmental groups team up to kill affordable energy.

By Phil Kerpen
July 16, 2012 4:00 A.M.

In June, the U.S. Senate voted, in effect, to shut down at least 35 gigawatts of electricity-generating capacity, 10 percent of America’s coal-fired power, by failing to overturn new mercury-emission rules for power plants. But even that’s nothing compared to what could well be President Obama’s most enduring, and senseless, legacy: the power-plant greenhouse-gas regulations, bought and paid for by the natural-gas industry, set to become permanent after the election, likely ending coal-fired electricity in America.

Read the rest at National Review Online and fight back at WarOnCoal.com.


Will the Roberts Court “break free” of the Constitution?

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Phil Kerpen
March 29, 2012

When President Obama was a senior lecturer at the University of Chicago Law School, he taught the Constitution from a decidedly unconventional perspective, one characterized not by admiration for the governmental structure designed by James Madison and his illustrious colleagues, but by contempt for it.

Read the rest at NRO Symposium: High Court Hopes.


Obama’s New Union Point Man

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NLRB appointee Richard Griffin is a reward for union bosses.

By Phil Kerpen
February 7, 2012 4:00 A.M.

On January 4, President Obama took the unprecedented step of declaring the Senate to be in recess — although the Senate considered itself to be in session — so that he could install several appointees in key positions at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). While a lot of attention has been focused on the procedural defect of these appointments (correctly, as I’ve explained), there has been far too little attention paid to the most radical of these appointees: Richard Griffin.

Read the rest at National Review Online.


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