Health Care

Correct spelling, canceled

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By Phil Kerpen

As an American, I laugh at those archaic British spellings. Colour? Honour? Their inferiourity, if you will, is obvious. Centre? Theatre? Ridiculous. Most of these barbaric forms were corrected in America hundreds of years ago. Yet one galling Britishism is appearing on my computer screen all too frequently of late: “cancelled,” with a gratuitous extra l.

Does something about Obamacare drive otherwise reasonable people to write about health plans being “cancelled” instead of “canceled”? Does the prospect of intrusive government involvement in health care cause us to regress? Is it subconscious deference to British and Canadian expertise at imposing socialized medicine? Whatever the cause, it needs to stop.



Health care law is a moral failure

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The United States federal government is now mandating, under penalty of law, that millions of Americans purchase a product through a broken website. Is that fair? Is it moral?

An estimated 16 million people recently received letters indicating that their health plans are no longer available. So they head to healthcare.gov to see what plans are available to them. And the website doesn’t work.

Read the rest at American Commitment.


Repealing the individual mandate is a budget deal winner

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Syria has taken over the top of the agenda, but very soon Congress will necessarily return to high stakes fiscal negotiations, not just over the continuing resolution to fund the government, but also over the federal debt ceiling. Speaker John Boehner is committed to the principle that has so effectively constrained discretionary spending since the historic summer 2011 deal: debt ceiling increases must be matched dollar-for-dollar with new spending cuts. At the top of the spending cut priority list should be elimination of the most widely hated aspect of the new health care law: the individual mandate.

Read the rest at American Commitment.


Uncircle the firing squad

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Republicans have largely squandered an August that should have been spent preparing the American people for a showdown with Democrats over the president’s health care law. Instead, efforts have largely been diverted to a damaging internecine fight between proponents and critics of the defund strategy.

Read the rest at American Commitment.




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